Mobile Wars [Part 1]: History of Mobile Industry

April 1, 2011

Mobile Wars is a special experiment on chaaps where we discuss on topic Mobile Wars extensively, This Series of articles is authored by Siddhu

The mobile industry is heading in an odd direction today. It seems like just yesterday developers were actively developing Symbian when all of a sudden Nokia announced that Symbian will no longer be supported. The result was a sad developer community. Many of the Symbian developers did not know where to go. The mobile market is a shifting market after all.

This is a sequel series that’ll cover the details about the mobile industry, present standards and future standards. By the end of this sequel you should be able to tell the pros and cons of each and every mobile platform and even judge on whether the present standards will remain a standard or whether newer technologies will replace them.

History is often boring. You do not need to know the history of anything except something that’ll give you a better understanding of today’s technology. That’s what this post will aim at.

There’s a really long history about the mobile industry. But most notably there are three stories worth telling:

  • Apple
  • Research In Motion(RIM)
  • Nokia

Apple:

In January 2007 Apple had announced that computers were no longer their prime focus. Instead, the focus was on what Steve Jobs referred to as the “Post-PC” period. Steve Jobs stated that the smaller devices were now capable of delivering the performance that computers one day used to deliver. He was right, he saw the future of the mobile industry before anyone else. Apple was known for its hardware that was always at top-notch. It wanted to bring the Apple quality outside PCs into the mobile world.

RIM

Research In Motion, a Canadian company, was beginning work on enterprise solutions. They could not make the top-notch hardware like Apple, but yet they could provide enterprise solutions in software extending it only to their hardware. The Blackberry Enterprise Server was thus born. This allowed all blackberry devices to push and pull email quickly from the company’s mail servers. This was fairly new technology to the mobile industry and only RIM mastered it at the moment. Companies and organisations immediately adopted the Blackberry Enterprise Server as a standard as it was not only blazing fast but also secure and ran in compliance with office mail servers.

Nokia

Nokia, primarily a handset manufacturer, was the first company to produce high quality low priced devices in the market. This let them gain market share easily. To improve Nokia products further, it joined forces with a few other companies to form Symbian – the mobile Operating System that had a majority of the market share till 2011. By deploying Symbian on their phones, Nokia rose high among the ranks and competed with the big companies such as Apple and RIM.

It should be clear why Apple, RIM and Nokia have a leading role in the mobile industry. Its because they’ve specialized in either the hardware or software or maybe even both. Or maybe its just because they were early in the game. Whatever be it the case, what’s really important to grasp from this article is the fact that just these three companies have been dominating the mobile market for quite a while.

In the next post in this sequel I’ll give a brief introduction to the problems related to hardware and software and even introduce you to the ARM architecture. Then you’ll clearly understand how Java helps solve this problem and united the whole of the mobile industry together.

Next Article: The rise of Java as a standard(coming soon)……

  • http://chaaps.com Chethan

    Nokia is a pioneer in India!

    • http://www.chaaps.com Murugappan

      Duh!

  • http://www.komododragonfacts.com Komodo Dragon

    I think RIM can go far and progress. They definitely have the right stuff and try to take in customer feedback a lot more than the others so that could pay off for them on the long run.

  • Shakti

    Apple got vision and innovation..It is going to dominate the market and will capture slipping Nokia customers..Having said that, although Nokia might have dumped Symbian but latest clubing with Microsoft may have some surprises in store..Sidd, nice article but I would expect a little mention to Android as well..:P

    • http://chaaps.com Siddhu

      You’ve an interesting view! Android will be mentioned in a future post.. This mainly applies to the companies dominating before android was acquired by google…

  • http://www.collegebookrenter.com/ used textbooks

    Hopefully they will start to develop faster phones with less load time. It seems like 4G is going to just be a farse.

  • http://www.childcare-vouchers.net Mr Child

    Hi Rawr, That is a very hard Quest. because that is in the Millions because in the USA there are a few Mils.& the larger #s are in China so that’s a heavy Question. If it’s that important to you why don’t you

  • http://www.netchunks.com Shiva @ Blogging Ideas

    I think the downfall of Nokia was caused by it not being able to update the Symbian along with what the competition demanded. While other OS like iOS, Blackberry, Android became strong powerful smartphone OS, Symbian was still a baby compared to them.

  • http://v Mr iApp

    It should be clear why Apple, RIM and Nookie have a leading role in the mobile industry. Its because they’ve specialized in either the hardware or software or maybe even both. Or maybe its just because they were early in the game.View original article at Chaps: Mobile Wars [Part 1]: History of Mobile Industry – Dominance of Apple RIM Nookie

  • http://www.childcare-vouchers.net Mr Child

    In the next post in this sequel I’ll give a brief introduction to the problems related to hardware and software and even introduce you to the ARM architecture. Then you’ll clearly understand how Java helps solve this problem and united the whole of the mobile industry together.

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